Kaart Çheerey - a Manx language map of the world

Kaart Çheerey - a Manx language map of the world
A Manx language map of the world - kaart.im

The month of September has been renamed to Maptember this year because of the number of geographic conferences that are going on. With the thought of a month of maps ahead, I decided to make a new map: a Manx language map of the world.

The map - known as a kaart çheerey in Manx - displays continents, countries and oceans that have been documented on the Manx language Wikipedia and visualises them as a browsable map which can be accessed at kaart.im.

My great grandparents were some of the last native speakers of the Manx language, and the language lost its last native speaker in 1974. In an effort to re-introduce the language to the island, Manx has been taught in schools on the Isle of Man since at least the early 1990s. Some children on the island are brought up as native Manx speakers (in addition to English) at the only Manx language school, Bunscoill Ghaelgagh. Manx translations can often be seen on road signs and other official signage, and can be heard on radio broadcasts and at the annual Tynwald Day ceremony.

I learned a bit of Manx at school, though not much of it has stuck with me. Because of that, I struggled a little to find all the names I wanted from the Manx Wikipedia, and I ended up simply searching for each country and seeing what was returned as the top result (or near the top). Often the names resemble the English version - especially if read out in a bit of a Manx accent - so it was usually obvious which article referred to the country. For example, Germany becomes Yn Ghermaan, Finland becomes Finnlynn and Canada becomes Yn Chanadey. Some smaller island nations didn't appear to have articles about them, but that there was an article for most countries in the world still struck me as quite impressive, for a language that is spoken fluently by such a small number of people.

The cartography on kaart.im could do with some tweaks still, but hopefully the map will be useful for anyone curious about this language from the heart of the British Isles. If you see any mistakes on the map, please let me know in the comments.

I'll likely be tweeting geographic things more often than usual this month @dankarran and may blog a little about the Society of Cartographers and FOSS4G conferences that I'll be attending as well.

Comments

Great post, Dan. Interesting about your grandparents :)
Hope you don't mind, I've shared your post in the COWAG group on Facebook. Well worth a skeet on there :)
And in some gratuitous self-promotion, if you struggle with any other translations, have a look at http://taggloo.im. It translates and sources phrases from its built-in dictionary and social media.